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Seven things I would do differently in my first breastfeeding, if I could go back in time

Breastfeeding is one of the best gifts we can give a baby in the first few months after birth. However, it is not always easy to start or maintain it, especially when you are a new mom and you have very little information and you have many questions about it.

For that reason, and because nobody knows how to be a mother, I share seven things with you, if I can return in time, I will do different things during my first breastfeeding to help other new nursing mothers. Provide services.

I would seek information before the arrival of my baby

I think this is one of the most important key points that will change everything. Before becoming a mother, I focused on other topics (work, leisure, various aspects of personal growth), so for me, the concept of breastfeeding is “naturally”.

In addition to preparing for childbirth (usually one of the most suspicious things for the first time), one of the best things we can do during pregnancy is to prepare for breastfeeding: read, look up information, talk to other breastfeeding mothers. . Find a lactation consultant that you can contact in time.

I would stress less

With the birth of my daughter a huge and eternal concern was born, which can stay with me throughout my life: to give her the best of me. My breastfeeding was not easy at first, and everything seemed to get more and more difficult after the emergency cesarean section (and I just became a mother for two days).

I was too nervous because I couldn’t latch well, which naturally made me feel desperate and wondered “Why is breastfeeding considered the most natural thing in the world and why do I have so many problems?” (Reality: breasts) It is simple in theory, because the practice is quite different).

I would be kinder to myself

Also, I will definitely be more friendly and patient with myself. When I was still recovering, I tried too hard and didn’t realize that if we didn’t get off to a good start, we might go back and try a more ideal breastfeeding later.

I would prepare a milk bank

Right or wrong, I managed to establish a mixed breastfeeding period with my daughter, who for the first two months had to breastfeed several times a day. But when my maternity leave ended and I had to go back to work, the little progress I had made began to frustrate me.

Exhausted all day, away from my daughter, in a place where there was no private space for milking, my production started to drop dramatically and finally stopped at eight months. If we had milk storage and pumping procedures set in advance, we could continue for a longer period of time.

Would trust me more

I believe that most of the errors and mistakes in my breastfeeding are caused by misinformation, but there is no doubt that fear and my first sense of insecurity have a great influence on all this.

Lack of self-confidence, tiredness, personal insecurity, and lack of other experienced mothers to guide or advise me make my breastfeeding frustrating because I can’t.

I would ask for advice

Maybe it’s because before I became a mother, I had never read any information about pregnancy and childbirth, but I found out that the lactation consultant did not exist until the day my daughter was born, when the hospital consultant came to visit and help us lets start.

With your help, I learned some basic knowledge, but it was not enough, because when I got home, I felt completely lost and so tired and confused that I never thought I could seek a counselor. Come and help me solve all these problems and difficulties. breast-feeding.

I would put guilt aside

This is likely to be limited to the entire motherhood experience. At first, many of us feel lost and worried because we were not doing well. Now, my daughter is still a baby for several years, and I see that when I need to be kind to myself, I have a lot of guilt on my shoulders.

Today, even though I am not breastfeeding I want, I have learned that there are many things I cannot change and I have learned to forgive new mothers who are full of fear and doubt. Now, I know, next time, things will get better.